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Jennifer Murphy portrait

Jennifer Murphy

Ph.D. student

Email: murphyjl4@vcu.edu

CV » [PDF]

 

M.S., Tulane University
Certificate, Disaster Mental Health and Trauma Studies
M.S.W., Tulane University
B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

Jennifer Murphy is a first-year doctoral student at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Social Work. Her academic and professional experiences have focused on children, trauma, and restorative practices in schools. Her research interests include the impacts of trauma on individuals and the decriminalization of trauma in schools and associated risk and protective factors. 

Murphy earned her Bachelor of Science in sociology from Virginia Tech in 2014, where she completed field experiences at a local crisis hotline, police department, and a women’s resource center. After receiving her B.S., she earned her Master of Social Work from Tulane University, with a Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Disaster Mental Health and Trauma Studies. She also earned her Master of Science in Disaster Resilience Leadership Studies from Tulane. While completing her degrees, Murphy fulfilled her field internship with the Center for Restorative Approaches, integrating and facilitating restorative practices in the schools of several Louisiana parishes in the Greater New Orleans area. 

Prior to enrolling at VCU, Murphy worked as a school social worker for three years with Lynchburg City Schools in Lynchburg, VA. During this time, she gained her Pupil Personnel License with an Endorsement in School Social Work from the Virginia Department of Education. She is a member of the Virginia Association of School Social Workers.

Selected publications

Haden, S., McDonald, S. E., & Murphy, J. (forthcoming). Violence against family pets. In T. Shackelford (Ed.) SAGE Handbook of Domestic Violence. Los Angeles, CA: SAGE Publications. 

Agnich, L. E., Kahle, L., Peguero, A., Murphy, J., Foroughi, O., & Nester, J. (2017). Does Breaking Gender Stereotypes Contribute to Victimization at School? Criminal Justice Studies, 30 (3), 257-275.